Posts Tagged ‘Queensland’

Monotyping at Megalo

March 17, 2013

 

 
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In between teaching days at the National Art School in Sydney, I’ve been doing some walking and camping, time on Sydney Beaches, seeing some shows etc.  This weekend I have traveled to Canberra for a bit of time in the studios at Megalo.  It’s a bit like a second home here at Megalo, since I am so familiar with the studio and presses.  I’ve been taking advantage of the big Hilton electric press to make some more monotypes, with the imagery referring back to summer in Queensland.  I’m thinking a whole new series might be nice, with the figure in the landscape being more explicit than some of my previous work.  They always take a lot longer than I expect though.  I only took two prints yesterday, and one at least should be trashed.  I’ve been here several hours this morning, and only the above print has so far come off the press, but I’m reasonably happy with it.  Bleed printed in a greenish black ink on a half sheet of Hahnemuhle (76 x 56 cm). Below is the second print from yesterday, showing how the drawing changes each time, especially since I am only working from a rough thumbnail drawing about one inch square, which itself was drawn from memory soon after visiting this creek in Mapleton National Park.  What might be lost in faithful realism, is amply made up for by what is gained in the freedom to express a mood and sense of the place without feeling the need to copy a photographic reference.

 

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Diversity in Print

March 7, 2013

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Last night saw the opening of Diversity in Print an exhibition of prints at the Royal Queensland Artist Society gallery on Petrie Terrace (Brisbane).  I’m in Sydney teaching at the moment so couldn’t get to the opening of course, but the good people there phoned to tell me I had been awarded a second prize for the wood engraving Forest Tunnel shown above.  This print was one of the ones I made in California, while at the JB Bunk residency.  I particularly like the crispness of the printed bark, that I had carefully retained on the block of birch wood as I cut and polished it prior to carving the image.  This print also makes use of  hand printing with a banana leaf barren in such a way as to produce subtleties of tone through the controlled use of variable pressure.  I’m glad to have been able to represent the somewhat neglected art of wood engraving in a show called Diversity in Print.

The show is on until 23rd March at 162 Petrie Terrace, Brisbane.

found art – crochet

March 4, 2012

Found this delightfully low key installation on Noosa’s Hastings Street recently.  The ye olde charm of the crotchet doilies contrasted nicely with the bling and commercialism of Hastings Street, while the off-white palette was very much in keeping with the dominant fashions of the local ladies.  Multi coloured Guerrilla Knitting just wouldn’t do for Hastings Street.  If you haven’t heard of guerilla knitting, than please do check out the link – you’ll be astounded!  It’s an ever growing movement sweeping the world, and if you keep your eye’s open there is plenty of it about.

This is a more typical Guerrilla Knit installation – this one found outside the Te Papa Museum in Wellington, New Zealand.

For yet another variation of fibre enhancements of public space, this fence had dozens of these small wool wrappings inserted.  The variations suggested many different makers, but I don’t know if it was the outcome of some organised event, or an accumulation of later passersby deciding to add in response after one persons initial incursion on the dreary site.

street fossils

February 7, 2012

 

 

I came across a whole bunch of concrete fossils recently, on a wet day in Noosaville.  You know, concrete fossils, those special places in the suburban landscape where traces of leaves and other life has been recorded in the man made lithosphere.  It cheers me just a little that urban man’s efforts at dead, uniform, cheerless surfaces can sometimes be subverted by something as simple as leaves falling on wet concrete.  In this case they were the leaves of Paperbark (Melalueca quinquenervia) which had left their imprint on a meandering footpath in this holiday apartment filled former wetland.


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