Posts Tagged ‘press’

drypoint

March 4, 2013

petersck

It was a busy start to the year, and my internet connection at home is rather tenuous, and so I somehow neglected to blog about the very exciting news that I have acquired a small etching press.  With assistance from the Australia Council for the Arts via an Artstart Grant, and the craftsmanship of Stephen, the press man at Melbourne Etching Supplies, my press arrived in early January.

Having a press now enlarges the range of techniques I can print at home to include intaglio methods such as etching and drypoint, as well as the type of monotypes with deep flat blacks that I like so much.  While a two person job to lift with ease, the press is technically ‘portable’, so I will, if need arrises, be able to print ‘on the road’ or give workshops in a broader range of techniques in locations without access to a press.

The first print I made on the new press was the drypoint above, depicting a curious waterfall I recently visited in Conondale National Park.  A day was spent exploring Peter’s Creek, upstream from Booloumba Falls, including this waterfall which plunges into hole about two meters across, with a very solid bedrock barrier between this turbulent, but out of sight, base of the falls and the large swimming hole in front of it.  No hint of current or bubbles gives any indication of the necessary connection between the two.  The maps I have give no name to this feature, but thought it deserved one, so Cauldron Falls it is.

As for the title of the print: So I Called it Cauldron Falls.

studio

June 24, 2012

I thought it was time I shared a few photo’s of the Artist in Residence studio here at Fiskars – in the basement of the apartment.  It is sparsely appointed, but I’ve got it looking productively messy, and the school’s etching press that happens to be being stored in the back room at the moment is getting a workout.  Finally a look back out the door and down the hill, past the SIWA (small grocery store) and to the new carpark.  From my desk I can watch the constant too-ing and fro-ing of locals going to SIWA, and the tourists and visitors crossing the market from their cars to the craft shops and galleries.  For a town with 600 residents it manages to feel quite busy.

 

 


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